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June 9, 2021
Author:
Kent Cissell, President, EightTwenty

Solar doesn’t work in Oklahoma

“Solar doesn’t work in Oklahoma,” they say.  At EightTwenty we talk to people in Oklahoma every day who tell us to pack up the “snake oil” and leave our own town.  

Here are the top 5 myths that Oklahoma residents often cite for why solar won’t work:

5.  It’s not sunny enough in Oklahoma for Solar.

Oklahoma is the nation’s 7th sunniest state (source).  Receiving 97% of the same sunlight as those in California, Oklahoma has a huge opportunity to harvest the natural energy of the sun.  

Better yet, solar panels perform better in milder temperatures.  Since Oklahoma rarely sees extended periods of extreme heat, this makes Oklahoma’s sunny periods even better for production compared to hot climates, such as Arizona or Nevada.  Oklahoma receives 13% more sunlight now than it did 20 years ago, and expectations are for that to continue to expand.  Oklahoma sun is fantastic for producing natural, sustainable energy.


4. Solar is ugly; our neighbors will hate us.

The perception of solar in the US is changing - quickly.  Innovation is empowering us to more affordably harvest natural, clean energy sources, like solar, in replace of dirtier sources. It is also creating energy supply diversity and more quickly empowering individuals, communities, businesses and countries with energy independence. 

As societies grow to understand the benefits of today’s solar panels for the common world we share, the attitude towards the solar aesthetic has changed.  In areas of high solar adoption - Australia, Europe, Hawaii - not having solar in the energy mix is seen as a negative.  

At EightTwenty, we focus on quality and longevity with our solar installations. As a result, we find that contrary to the popular belief neighbors ask us to put solar on their homes as well!


3. Energy costs in Oklahoma are too low for Solar to make sense.

The cost of solar is decreasing, while the national average utility energy cost continues to climb. According to EIA, residential electricity rates have risen across the U.S. by 12.6% over the past 10 years. Meanwhile, the costs to install solar have dropped more than 70% in the past decade (source).  There is open competition for leveraging the fusion reactor in the sky (the sun) to create energy, and it is expected that competition will continue to drive the price of solar down in years to come.  

The financial benefit of solar is great for most Oklahomans.  Now is the time to take control of your energy costs by eliminating rate increases for your personal power plant - much like the benefits of homeownership. EightTwenty offers competitive financing options to eliminate upfront expenses and keep the per month costs at par.


2. Oklahoma is too windy, and our hail storms will chew through solar panels.

We have yet to hear of a single solar module in Oklahoma that has been damaged by hail.  Our trusted vendors put their products through rigorous quality control processes, which include testing for resistance to hail.  

The same can be said for wind.  Each of our installations are reviewed by structural engineers, and solar technology is developed with windy situations in mind.  Remember, Solar Engineers develop their solutions for use in places like Florida and Hawaii where Hurricane’s frequent.  Oklahoma has its share of severe weather events, but Solar solutions are built for it.


1. If solar really worked, everyone would be doing it.

If you are in Oklahoma, you are at the forefront of a movement.  The early adopters are just now figuring out that solar makes sense - ecologically and economically.  

State laws changed in Oklahoma in 2018 to spur the adaptation of harvesting natural energy sources. The first big wave has yet to hit from these policy changes.  

When we bring customers on board, they are telling their friends about the immediate benefits they are experiencing from making the decision to Live Solar. And the line to adapt to Solar is only growing.  Projections for solar growth over the next 10 years are through the roof.  It will be hard to get the attention of a quality installer as things continue to heat up, so don’t wait too long.

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